How I Almost Became A Blind Photographer


You never know how precious your eyes are until you come close to losing them or at least losing your sight even if the eyes remain in their sockets. Last week, I had reason to be grateful for the gift of sight.  It was like any other Monday at the office; busy as ever. The work day soon ended and my colleagues and I headed home. I got to Ojota and boarded a bus heading to Ikorodu as usual.

The ride was uneventful for the most part or at least till we got past Mile 12. From then on, the traffic was a nightmare, two lanes had been turned to four by impatient motorists and the super-impatient ones had crossed the median to face oncoming traffic; a phenomenon commonly referred to as “passing one-way”. As terrible as it sounds, this isn’t unusual on that road. It’s disorganized chaos that people who ply that road have grown accustomed to.

Suddenly, I heard a loud thump on the bus and wondered what it was. Looking out the window, I saw the most ridiculous thing ever; LASTMA officials picking stones and throwing  at vehicles on the wrong side of the road. Even though I understood that it was wrong for people to face oncoming traffic on that road, (and it is very unsafe too), I didn’t see the wisdom in law enforcement officers throwing stones at innocent passengers.

A few minutes passed as the journey continued. I decided to call my husband and let him know that I was almost at the bus-stop. Just as I finished speaking with him and ended the call, it hit me like a ton of bricks. I felt something hit my right eye real hard and felt water pour all over me. With one hand over my eye and my head bowed, I could hear my self screaming, “Yee, yee! My eyes”. I could hear the guy sitted on my left side saying, “Sister sorry o”. My mind was in a daze as I struggled to make sense of what just happened and also cope with the pain of something hitting my eye with such force.

At this point, I could hear the lady sitting by my right hand side, asking if I was okay. I asked her what just happened and she explained to me that it was LASTMA officials who threw pure water satchets at the bus. That was when I realized, what hit me was a satchet of pure water and it hit my eye with such force that it busted.

On getting home, I narrated the ordeal to my husband who was almost as irritated and pained as I was. I assured him I was okay and started showing him some of the pictures from our photo shoot the week before. While we both admired the pictures, I felt something streaming out of my nostrils, it was blood! Bright red blood was streaming out of my nose! My alarmed husband rushed to get me toilet paper to contain the bleeding.

My husband watched with concern written all over his face while I applied pressure to my nose area with blood-soaked tissue paper, assuring him that I’d be just fine. Well, after a few minutes of waiting for the blood to cease and it didn’t, I got a bit scared myself and told him I needed to lie on a flat surface. Off to bed I went. The bleeding subsided shortly after I got in bed.

As I laid in bed, I thought of the nameless, faceless guy whose “bullet” hit me and caused me all these harm. If I felt anything for him at that moment, it sure wasn’t love. What could a passenger like me have done to stop a lawless bus driver from flouting the law? What kind of city hires confused human beings (like the ones I had encountered that night), to enforce traffic laws?

The next day, I set out to work as early as usual, way before sunrise. It was later in the morning that I realized that my right eye was quite sensitive to light. It was fine as long as I stayed indoors but hurt really bad the moment I came out in broad daylight. This went on for two more days before my eye felt a bit normal.

Thinking back at the whole episode (after the emotions of anger and frustration had diffused), I, Ronke Alao, thought of how fortunate I was. Imagine if the LASTMA fellow had chosen a stone as his weapon that day and it hit my eye, doing real damage to it? I’d love to make a name for myself as a photographer but not as a one-eyed photographer. We as photographers tend to gush over our expensive gadgets and the new lens released into the market that is meant to see better than the human eye. As much as we value these expensive equipment, let’s always remember that we are blessed with the most precious “lens” of all, that can’t be ordered on a website: our very EYES.

 

LAGOS: Why I LOVE & HATE This City


As I drafted these words at 7.56pm on Friday , somewhere between Ojota and Ketu; I thought of how my week had been busy, fun, interesting and plain crazy all at the same time. It was a week that had two days declared as public holidays but I still had to show up for work on those two days. Two of my colleagues were allowed to stay home and enjoy the holiday while three  came to work. I was so jealous of those that stayed home. Sometimes I think my boss makes me work harder just because I am a woman. Giving you examples that illustrate my point is easy but I choose not to digress.

One of the most bizarre things I witnessed this week was on Ikorodu road, (you must be tired of reading my Ikorodu road stories by now but it’s too much craziness not to write about), as usual. I was in a bus heading home and the driver wanted to get on the express from the service lane but wasn’t patient. The traffic was pretty much “bumper to bumper” and the bus driver had blocked a private car. It was a big mess. The driver was asked to back up a little bit but he wouldn’t budge. Next thing we knew, the guy driving the private car got  out of the car with a horsewhip and whipped my bus driver!

I was shocked out of my mind and I don’t know where I got the guts to speak from but I started shouting almost uncontrollably. “Ha! What rubbish is this? Driver, please reverse o! This man must be an animal. Let’s get away from this spot”. I shouted amidst the driver’s cries. I was too shocked at the jungle justice being displayed by the man with the horsewhip. I was even more shocked to note that the other passengers didn’t seem to care much. ‘Why is Lagos so lawless and cold? And to think there are people leaving their villages in droves to come to this crazy city’, I thought to myself.

As we drove on, the driver talked and laughed about how the whip didn’t really hurt him and I felt like punching him in the head.

As much as I resumed at the office on the public holidays, I still had fun on Tuesday. That’s because my husband and I had a photo shoot. My colleague, Samuel, had found out that my hubby and I had not had a photo session since we got married so he asked that he take pictures of us and I couldn’t say no to such an offer. It was so much fun for me and a lot more fun for my husband  He couldn’t stop talking about it all day. For those longing to have a visual image of who the GREAT Ronke Alao is, attached are 2 clues to help you out.Ronke Alao 2 Ronke Alao

Another newsworthy development is the fact that I am no longer the only female intern at eloPhotos. Yes, I now have company in the person of  Damilola. Damilola is a 500level medical student who is making good use of her time while ASUU and the Federal government figure out a way to make up and stop bickering at each other. She is honing her photography skills and just when you think that is all this pretty, slim and attractive lady is doing; you find out she is also taking piano lessons.

You should know by now that I like her a lot. I admire her quest for knowledge and her interest in the arts. There is more to her life than bulky medical textbooks and dissecting cadavers. If you are wondering if she is single, come see me “in-camera” with your consultation fees. That’s not stuff I can discuss on a blog.

Now, for a list of things I am grateful for. I am grateful for the opportunity to be an intern at eloPhotos; for working with a boss that doesn’t mind exposing his own mistakes so you can learn not to make the same; grateful for God’s protection on the roads despite the antics of crazy bus drivers; glad I am learning how important record-keeping is in a business like this and learnt enough for my boss to call me the “Financial Controller“.

If you’ve been in the photography business for a while or you are just venturing into it and the idea of keeping a statement of income and expenses scares you, fear not. If you think promoting your business on social media simply means throwing a few pictures on your facebook page, think again. If you would like to stand out and make a name for yourself in this industry, would you be willing to do WHATEVERITTAKES? If so, register for the workshop taking place in different cities across Nigeria starting October 23rd. You owe it to your children, (born and unborn) to attend. CLICK HERE for more details.

Reporting LIVE from eloPhotos,
Ronke Alao

 

How To Become The Star Of A Reality Show: A Script by Ronke Alao


Watching T.V is not one of my favorite things to do. There seems to be so much crap, (excuse my French), on T.V. these days that sorting the good from the terrible programs can be time-consuming. At the top of the list of programs I consider terrible include reality shows. Probably because I don’t see the reality in them. They are scripted,boring and lack entertainment value in my opinion.

The only kind of shows that I know of, worthy of being tagged “reality shows” are those I see in ‘danfo‘, (Lagos Commercial buses, usually Volkswagen brand) on a weekly basis. You want real life drama, comedy or thriller? Simply find your way into a danfo headed for Ikorodu (or some other place where the traffic is horrible and you can be sure of being in the same bus for at least two hours).

There’s so much to write about what goes on in this buses that I get tired just thinking about it. Sometimes the bus gets so noisy that I almost wish we could go back to the days when no one had mobile phones in Nigeria. If it’s not a bunch of people playing music loudly on their phones, then it’s someone talking too loudly on the phone, raising their voice and cursing the person at the other end of the phone out. Of course there is always that someone who lies through his teeth, (sorry guys but I think men top the chart for this behavior), about his location. “I am now at Mile 12”, he shouts on the phone, when he is in fact still at Ojota.

I remember sitting next to a lady once who was answering her phone and the next thing I knew, she stuck the phone in my ear and frantically said, “Sister, please say ‘hello’ “. With a confused look, I said a hello to the stranger on the other end of the phone. Apparently, the lady was talking to a guy who was probably her boyfriend or husband and she was trying to convince him that she was indeed in a commercial bus and not riding in a private car. I am so glad my husband never has to do that; he’s my hubby afterall, not a monitoring spirit!

Like many people, I have my preferred seat in the bus and it’s usually just by the window. This seat comes with its perks. For instance, I can easily buy my favorite roadtrip snack – yogurt – in the slow moving traffic. The one risk I have to be aware of when sitting by the window is that of having someone from the street snatch my Blackberry phone from my hands right across the window. This can be a serious concern when I attempt to capture an interesting image of something happening on the street with my phone.  I try to avoid the front seat because that usually means wearing the seat belt. I believe in wearing the belt as a safety measure but in most danfos, the belt is just something you throw around your neck to avoid being caught by LASTMA officials. They are usually faulty and I believe some can actually strangle you in event of an accident.

For guys who need a free lesson on how NOT to toast a babe, all you need do is watch the drama in these buses. What annoys me most is when I inform a guy that I’m married and he doesn’t quit pestering me. Then, he goes ahead to answer a call from someone whose name is stored as “Sweetheart” on his phone. It makes me want to punch him in the nose and ask, “Why are you so shameless?”, but then I don’t.

Most danfo drivers have personalities that bother around aggression. Well, maybe Lagosians are generally aggressive but these drivers get a daily overdose of it; especially those that ply Ikorodu road. They drive recklessly and seem to forget they actually have humans as passengers. Sometimes, my ride home looks like something out of an action movie where the driver weaves in and out of traffic, faces oncoming traffic and slams on the brakes like he just saw a ghost. In most cases, passengers try to put in a word of caution but I’ve had a few occasions where the driver drove quite decently but the passengers were disturbed by this and kept chanting, “Driver,what’s your problem? Can’t you face one-way? I thought you could drive rough like the rest of them o.”.

There are days when I don’t board a danfo. I sometimes get lucky and find a private car owner willing to give passengers a ride for a fee. A few of this drivers act just as badly as danfo drivers sometimes but for the most part, they are well-behaved. One of such well-behaved guys was one who gave me a ride from Ojota to Ikorodu. We were in pretty bad traffic and even though I was seated at the back seat, I could sense the driver was quite uncomfortable. My antenna ears picked something he mumbled about having used ‘MistMag’ with no relief. I immediately knew he had digestive issues. The moment we got to a gas station, he apologized to everyone in the car and said he had to use a restroom urgently. No one dared complain. This guy had just charged us N150 from Ojota to Ikorodu on a day when commercial buses were charging N300.  He returned in about ten minutes, looking very relieved and full of appreciation. “Thank you so much, sorry for keeping you waiting please, thanks a lot and God bless you…”. On and on he went like we had saved him from terrorists or something.

Recently, I have been thinking about how my attitude and demeanor changes when I am on the road. I realized how I was letting the aggression and craziness rub off on me. It used to be that I would watch the madness around me and not be a part of it. In fact, I enjoyed watching the show unfold and be somewhat inspired by it as an artist. Now, it seems I have joined in the mindless discussions that sometimes take place in the bus. I once caught myself using nasty words to describe a driver to his face and I immediately felt shame. ‘Ronke, you are better than this’, I thought to myself.

No, I am not ruled by my environment. I am governed by the Spirit of the most high God living on the inside of me. I choose to bless and not curse. This attitude sets me free to be the best photographer I can possibly be. It helps me release the creative energy that my heavenly daddy stuffed on the inside of me.

Life in Lagos buses, everyday is a different reality show whose entertainment value surpasses the shows on Television. Who needs T.V drama?Truth is indeed stranger than fiction.

Yours Truly,
Ronke Alao
Writer | Photographer | Poet

My 1st Professional Wedding Coverage: Praise & Tosin Fowowe


WoW! It was 7 years yesterday (September 16, 2006) when I handled my first DSLR (Olympus e500 with 2 kit lenses) to shoot my very first wedding. It was the union of two of my friends Praise & Tosin. Going through my archives, I could easily see some improvements I’ve made over time in covering weddings. I decided to post the pictures unedited so everyone will know where the journey started for me photographically. I think the pictures we take now look nicer; perhaps the couple can hire us for the 10th Anniversary REUNION. Here’s to wishing Praise a Glorious Birthday and a Happy Anniversary. 🙂

 

The FUN, The WEIRD & The RIDICULOUS


My week officially started on Tuesday. No, I didn’t skip work on Monday but as I stood in line at Silverbird Cinemas for ‘free’ popcorn and drink; the sweet aroma of the corn filtering through my nostrils and enveloping my sinuses, I felt like my week had just started.

The trip to the movies was sponsored by eloPhotos as a treat/field trip of some sorts. There’s something about seeing great movies that sharpens one’s artistic mind.

Not too long after arriving at the movies, I saw about five photography colleagues that had come to see the same movie I came to see, Elysium. I thought that was interesting. Perhaps we photographers should speak to the management of Silverbird Cinemas and see if we can strike a deal, where photographers enjoy a movie discount.

While still waiting to get my free snack, I suddenly heard a voice behind me saying, “…you could go in and see the movie for ten minutes, then come back out and the popcorn line wouldn’t be so long anymore”. I didn’t have to turn to recognize the voice; it was my boss. I couldn’t believe Mr Seun was back at the Cinema to see the same movie for the third time! I had left him and the rest of the team at the office since they all had seen the movie. No one knew Mr Seun had plans to ‘sneak’ out of the office to see the movie again.

I finally got my popcorn and fanta then found the cinema room. The movie ran for a little less than two hours and in one word, I would simply describe it as AWESOME. In case you haven’t seen it, I do not want to spoil the fun for you so I won’t give you the gist. GO SEE IT.

Tuesday ended on an interesting note. My alternate cellphone got lost in a bus and I didn’t realize it till I got home. I tried appealing to the good nature of whoever picked it by sending text messages; since he/ she wouldn’t pick my call. It didn’t work.

The next day came along and I lost an earring. Perhaps I am having my things walk away from me, one at a time. The day’s highlight was having Maximus of Phaneross Photography come and speak to eloPhotos interns on the topic, “Improving Your Photography”. It was an insightful 3-hours lecture.

As if the week had not been strange enough for me, Wednesday afternoon had to have it’s own element of weirdness. I boarded a bus headed for Ikorodu from Ojota. Just before we got to Ikorodu, I found that almost everyone in the bus was talking about some guy, a muslim cleric, who died years ago. They said he recently made an ‘appearance’ on the wall of a mosque at Owode area. His image was said to have appeared on a wall. People were reported to have taken pictures of this wonder and were now selling 5 X 7″ photo prints in traffic. Strange story or biggest scam of the year? You decide.

Lagos being the crazy city it is, I never run out of amazing things to see everyday. Things such as a man holding the cab door open for a lady to enter first. This happened on Thursday. I was taken aback, surprised to see this guy who didn’t know me, open the door for me. This may seem ordinary to you but after a week of seeing even pregnant ladies been pushed off by desperate passengers hoping to get in a bus, seeing a gentleman was very refreshing.

Thursday turned out to be a busy day. We had an event-Dieko and Tunbosun’s engagement- to cover. I headed to the groom’s hotel room to take shots of him while my colleague covered the bride. The groom was quite camera-shy but after chatting with him and doing my best to make him relax, he got comfortable with having his pictures taken.

The event was fun to cover and will stand out in my mind as the first event where I was served food. If I had any doubts in my mind about wedding photography been physically challenging, those doubts got cleared on Friday morning. I woke up wondering what hit me. I became very aware of muscles I never knew I had. My leg felt like it had 50 kg weights strapped to it.

On Friday, we had what you could call a strategy meeting. Mr Seun Akisanmi met with the interns and discussed what we learnt at the previous day’s event and what we could do better subsequently; especially on saturday for the church wedding and reception.

On my way home on Friday, I met a former school colleague at Ojota and we got talking. We both graduated from the same faculty. He asked if I worked close by. I was dressed very casually but looked smart. I proudly told him, “I am now a photographer and work at Ikeja”. I think I impressed myself with the confidence with which I said it. It felt good.

It was a week full of fun, weird happenings and ridiculous stuff but I am glad it is over.

My name is Ronke Alao & I am proud to be a female photographer.

 

Knowing When to FIRE Your MENTOR


It’s a dicy issue to talk about. But there comes a time when you have to move on with whatever mentoring relationship you have with someone you respect and admire. Knowing that “right” timing is very key to your growth as an artist or individual.

When I got back from America and decided to venture professionally into photography, I met a few potential mentors. One will still remain a mentor till this day: Kelechi Amadi-Obi. Though known by a few to have his own issues or “weaknesses”, Kelechi is someone who has built a brand you will consider successful. Though some will argue that he has been “over-celebrated”, one thing that stands him out from some other top photographers is his desire to share his knowledge wholeheartedly with any hungry soul. Coupled with the fact that he has a track record very few Nigerian photographers can compete with, this has made him a photographer many enthusiasts and young professionals will love to be like “when they grow up”.

That being said, I’ve known a few people who believe that he’s not all that. One apprentice even confessed to me that the last day she worked with Kelechi was the day she witnessed him take pictures of NAKED women. “How can he engage in such an ungodly act”, she exclaimed. That was something the apprentice could not comprehend as “right” in her christian mindset. Truth is it isn’t something my christian mind can comprehend either. As a minority in my family, I have the privilege of being surrounded by 3 beautiful female beings; I do not need to see any more naked textures of a lady outside my family. My mind is just too creative to remain stable after my eyes have feasted on………..

That being said (or should it be “that being written”), relating with a mentor like Kelechi for me can be likened to eating shark fish; you need to sort out the bones and eat the delicious flesh. Very few people I know are picky enough to consider it too much trouble to eat most fishes or meat because of too much bones. In some cases, the bones are even digested after the main meal.

Relating with a lot of my mentors has been a continuous & deliberate act of focusing on their strengths instead of digesting their weaknesses. However, you can choose to be like my cousin who does not like eating chicken at all because of the stress of going through the bones. You can choose to dislike a mentor once you discover he/she has a weakness that your stomach can’t seem to digest. When such a reality dawns on you, it is expedient for you to quietly “FIRE” the mentor rather than have the weakness torment your relationship.

By “FIRE”, I’m referring to a way by which you will quietly close the door on the relationship instead of “SLAMMING” the door. You never can tell when you might need to go back through that same door. Besides, relating with mentors should also bring to your reality that they’re also as human as you are and sometimes with more flaws than people know. It is better to quietly end the relationship than to be an agent that specializes in marketing the weaknesses of others. What you sow, you will reap.

Sometimes I wonder what it’s like for those that look up to me afar off and when they finally join eloPhotos as interns, they realize that I have serious issues I still struggle with. They know my weaknesses and still decide to stay their full tenure. Can’t they see that I can be a workaholic who sometimes forgets that he’s married with 3 ladies to cater for. Can’t they see that I have a weakness of spending my last N1k to watch a movie called ELYSIUM even though I’ve watched it twice already. Can’t they see that although I studied Accounting in an American University, I still can’t make my balance sheets balance. They see all these and still choose to stay.

If the knowledge of your mentors’ weakness becomes too much for your soul to bear, its time to make a decision that might help save your soul. It’s time to become a distant fan and not a close protegee. I’ve had to become an admirer to at least 5 of the people I once considered mentors. For me the deal breaker is when the weakness is a major character flaw that I consider inexcusable (e.g. lying, cheating, adultery, etc). It’s just hard to see that person as someone I’ll like to be like when I grow up.

Severing the relationship can be painful but slamming the door on the relationship can cause more harm than good. When you get to the crossroad where all you see constantly is that person’s weakness, perhaps you should consider prayerfully FIRING the person. Its way better than bad-mouthing the person in front of others.

Perhaps I might be wrong on my stance. Perhaps I might be right. It’s your call to decide if this mentor of yours will FOREVER be your “role-model”. Or what would you do if you discover that your mentor of integrity confessed to embezzling bank funds entrusted to his care? What will you do?

Yours faithfully,
Your Photography Mentor in need of a BlackBerry Q10,
Seun Akisanmi

 

604800 Seconds In The Life Of A FEMALE Photographer


The new week started like any other. I got to work at 7.15am, did some cleaning till about 8am and we started morning devotion. I had the privilege of sharing with my colleagues from the Holy Bible . The text was taken from Colossians 3:23&24: Work willingly at whatever you do, as though you were working for the Lord rather than for people. Remember that the Lord will give you an inheritance as your reward, and that the Master you are serving is Christ.

In essence, it isn’t only working in church that counts as working for God, our “secular” job should also be seen as working for God because it really is. So, even when the people we appear to work for are not meeting up with the expectations we have of them, we should remember that Christ is the one we are serving even on that job.

After devotion, I got started on the task at hand; redoing the photobook cover that I didn’t get right the previous week. About half an hour later, I started doing intermittent dances and singing funny songs. Whether I was simply happy or getting high on sniffing too much adhesive, I really did not know.

Several minutes later…I don’t know how long it took really, probably lost my sense of time temporarily. Anyway, after a while, I finished the photobook. It was better than the last but still not decent-looking. Mr Seun’s verdict? Well, I had to do it again the next day. Now I understand how it must feel for babies growing teeth. It hurt but I had to go through this experience…or do I really have to?

The ride home to Ikorodu after closing hours was rough. As if the terrible traffic wasn’t enough torture, the bus driver drove like he was practicing his next role as the stuntman in the movie, “The Expendables”. It was interesting to hear fellow passengers calling their loved ones to ‘report’ the reckless driver, as if that would somehow set him straight.

As we approached Ikorodu, I got so hungry and couldn’t wait to get home. On getting off the bus, I smelt roasted corn and could not resist. I bought a couple and sunk my teeth into it right there on the street. No time for observing dining etiquette, this was an emergency. The hunger was so intense that it felt like my eyes were popping out of their sockets.

I eventually got to the spot where my hubby usually picks me up and I was so glad to see him. He watched with interest as I “attacked” the corn. Though my husband isn’t a big fan of roadside foods and wouldn’t eat on the street to save his life, he knew this was no time to preach it to me. The corn was a life-saver.

My husband asked how my day went and I told him I had to do the photobook again. I was hoping he would feel very sorry for me and join my pity-party. Instead, he held me and said, “Don’t worry, it’s an opportunity to learn”. I instantly felt like there was a conspiracy somewhere and my husband and my boss were in on it.

On Tuesday, with the help of Mr Seun Akisanmi, I finally got the fundamentals of photobook binding and I made the best photobook ever! Completing the project was like reaching a waterfall after several days of walking through the dry desert. Sweet relief!

The evening commute was crazy as usual. I gave my husband periodic updates on where I was at . The traffic was terrible. He sent me a message saying, “I love you”. That melted the stress off me instantly. Just then, I noticed the guy sitting beside me in the bus was peeking at my messages. What nonsense, is privacy too much to ask for in a Lagos bus?

The rough ride to Ikorodu ended when I got off the bus. Was so glad to see my husband waiting for me as usual. I don’t know what these past three months, (that I have spent training at eloPhotos), would have been like for me if not for his understanding and support. I got in the car and heard the Mary Mary song, “Shackles”, playing. How appropriate. I felt so free having completed the photobook. I couldn’t help but do a wild dance in the car as my husband bursted out laughing. As I did my crazy dance, I wondered again if I was just happy or had sniffed too much adhesive. Who knows?

My day on Wednesday felt weird. Not having to do a photobook cover after being haunted by one for almost a week felt good. I got busy working on the monthly statement of expenses. I am not an accountant and I don’t play one on TV. In fact, I don’t enjoy counting cash or balancing accounts but somehow, I have been given this responsibility at eloPhotos so here I was. The more I tried to collate the figures, the more it seemed the number jumped off the page and mocked me.

I got done with the July statement and then had the privilege of watching Mr Seun do a kind of photobook we have never done before. I couldn’t possibly describe it. You have to see it to appreciate its beauty.

Thursday began on a rainy note; thank God I had my small umbrella. The commute to work would have been uneventful if not for the wonderful driver that thought speeding by and splashing me with water from the waist down was such a great idea! Interestingly, I had my earphones on at that time and was listening to my audio Bible. A few seconds after I got ‘sprayed’, the words I heard from the audio Bible was, “Forgive whatever grievances you have against one another”. God does have an interesting sense of humor, doesn’t He?

The main project of the day was a conceptual photo shoot of a depressed unemployed man, staring blankly at a sign that read “No Vacancy”. It was such fun. Elozi, a client of ours whose wedding we will be covering in October at Warri, came around to discuss final details and also to confirm the names of the photographers she’ll need to make airline ticket reservations for.

Somehow, I feel the week sped by pretty fast. Before I knew it, Friday was here. I mostly did administrative duties – attending to a colleague who needed to rent some equipment, burning CDs for past participants of NiPHEC and reconciling the account. Keeping the books have been such a huge challenge. It’s as though numbers don’t like me and play wicked tricks on me.

As I draft these words on my Blackberry phone, while sitting in a bus headed for Ikorodu, I saw an amazing sight. It was of a driver of a giant bus who took advantage of the almost non-moving traffic by heeding the call of nature. Yes, he urinated right there in the middle of traffic, on the famous Ikorodu road. When he was finished with business, he got back in the bus, it was then I noticed the bus he was driving had the inscription, “Lagos State Waste Management Authority”. Yeah, their driver sure knows how to manage waste!

Anyway, that’s how my week went down. Till we meet again online next week, here’s to hoping that my diary of experience at eloPhotos is of help to your photography career/hobby.

I’m Ronke Alao & I’m proud to be the ONLY female PHOTOGRAPHER at eloPhotos.

Cheers