In Prayers & Business


Starting the week with God in prayer and singing was not uncommon, Red 19 was on ground to head the session, Mr Seun Akisanmi had ended the prayers with his poetic-like lines. The first and the only regular meeting of the week had begun, everyone with one or two words; one two three the ball was passed and in few minutes to the hour the meeting was over.

Our usual training session had started with Sal Cincotta, a video session of about 29hrs, the thing was to break it down and take the dose of photography and business bit after bit. The Basic business principle was explained; either in photography or any other it’s all same: pricing, marketing, target market and the face of the brand. During the period one could easily behold himself as in a mirror. The description of a man who enjoys creative and passionate of his craft, he set out on a business venture to make earning, in no time he soon becomes aware of the enormity of the task he has embarked on and that business is business. His emotion and sentiment had brought him nowhere. The business is riddled with the passion of the craft, family and friend factor, and the face of undesired and undeserved clients. He is faced with mounting bills and cost, and the craft had brought him no farther than he thought.

Video classes are not uncommon with the foreign artist, and so much for download on youtube and some other video platforms. Majority are centered on camera techniques and skills, posing techniques and its likes, and just a little on doing the business of photography, getting to see the video was just it, and no much fun can be than to listen to the artist with much of the understanding of the business.

Sal Cincotta is very successful business owner and the owner of the Salvatour Cincotta photography. He turned pro back in 2007/2008, and made successes in the business of photography. His business had a time declared 1 million dollars in the year 2014 as revenue.

Snapshot was a part of the week of business of photography. We had hosted him to facilitate a class on the Tuesday. We suspended our video lecture and justify his presence with the attention of our team to his knowledge and experience. His local perspective was best right on time, no better time to share his over five year’s journey. One of the high point was to him making money and improving his art without a sense of direction and vision. At a point he made up his mind to take up the full-time role of an artist after a period of about four years and his journey had been much adventurous.

One or two things to pick, sometimes we tend not to agree their perspective of life, but they have a message and the result is evident. Mr Seun had made arrangement for us to be part of the seminar down on the island; Sottu was on ground to discuss business. The talk had ended with just little on the business and more on his techniques and portfolio. His openness to show his pricing and his packages was it for me. The bottom line is Sottu has just decided to join the league of the few who are committed and passionate about helping the upcoming.

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IT IS SCRAP


“Do not blame the rich, they do not know how it feels to be poor.” That is the interpretation I gave to the outburst of a speaker at the summit I attended recently, saying cameras that are not high ends are scraps. But he failed to teach us how to get there. As much as I agree that a very good and very expensive gears kill the job for you as a photographer, you do not get to access such gears at startup except you have a rich family background. So how do you save up to acquire the “high ends” if not by using the “scraps,” which makes great images as well; after all, the camera only makes the image your eyes already saw.

I suppose he is one of the rich dudes that started out as a big boy. I sincerely did not get his point because not even he will lend out his “high-end” gear to a newbie photographer, so how does a “not privileged” newbie pull through? Really, I am grateful for the foundational education in eloPhotos, very balanced I must say.

Analysing Bayo Omoboriowo and his philanthropic photography was a high point in the week for me. Yes I call a philanthropist; His foresight is deep, his interest and commitment to things and people is impressively genuine. So many of us photographers pursue money, but he personifies the saying; “Pursue your passion and success/money will follow you pants down.” The whole event of “The Coversation”/Book launch held at the Presidency showcased his high level of wisdom,value-adding attribute, forward thinking, humility, human relations… I can go on and on, the guy
captured my heart. And all these attributes did not just jump on him as the presidential photographer, he has upheld these values and the philanthropic nature since when he was a street photographer, had a personal experience with him back in the years. Something cuts at me, who does that? Giving all the proceeds from his book launch to IDPs (Internally Displaced Persons).

All the efforts, all the calibre of people who attended the event and their supposed depth of donations! Who does not like money, not even in this recession. It reiterated the truth that; “Joy is not defined by wealth, it is contentment that has its key,” and “wealth is not in money, but how many lives you affected positively.”

October 1st won’t leave my mind in a haste, not just because it was Nigeria’s Independence, but this contentment thing that brings joy confronted me again. Took out time with some younger friends to go visiting some families unannounced, just to show some love. Touched quite a number of places but one stood out. More than meeting a full house (the whole family members were present), much more than meeting them eating, the aura in the home lighted my heart. Even though we were getting tired by then because of moving from one place to the other, we were energized by the so much love in the family. They were not the “rich” that had varieties to munch, they did not have beautifully painted walls, well tiled floors or beautiful sofas, but they had joy.

We actually met all of them; Dad, mum and four well-built young men eating “garri (cassava flakes) and beans” from the same plates, gisting and laughing over the meal. Wow! I felt that was awesome and will be more tasteful than eating “fried rice and chicken” crampy. They were all very friendly and funny, I sincerely loved what I saw. Contentment is sure a virtue to be valued in life.

I am not sure going to stop taking life lessons as I, Mosopefoluwa Onanusi, savor my photography skill learning.

Attached are pictures taken last week. Do let me know what you think of them

evening-sky-ait-rd-6 evening-sky-ait-rd-10 macror-1 rainbow-after-rain-ait-rd

The N100k I LOST


As happy and motivated as I was, I dashed my dreams and disappointed myself. I had a hundred
thousand naira within my grasp and on a platter, all I needed to do was complete a simple task of
negotiating for a particular commodity for a particular price and redeem the N100K prize but
unfortunately I was unable to complete the said task. The situation was and is so disheartening that I
can’t even explain the details without shedding a tear. The fact that I lost the money is not as hurting as
not being able to complete the task.

The week brought a lot of lessons along while coming; having not to cover an event for a cousin was a
big deal for me and became a platform to learn something new. I kind of had a soft spot for her and
didn’t even charge her a reasonable amount because she’s family, unfortunately she wanted a free job. I
really don’t understand why because I also used to have that mindset before that if my family member
ran a business I should pay less or nothing to get their services or goods, now it seems difficult for me to
charge a family member but this issue is something that is needed to be really dealt with if not, one will
soon run out business.

We have been watching a video on Sal Cincotta’s lecture on the business of photography and among all
that I’ve been learning, he said we shouldn’t feel bad for charging what we charge as photographers and
as business persons generally but should be confident to charge what we as well as our service is worth.
He also gave us tips on how to transform our business from the ordinary to an outstanding business
outfit. As much as it sounded harsh and not nice the Business tips from Sal Cincotta plus admonitions
from my boss came in handy for the negotiation with my cousin during the week because I probably
would have done the job for free on her own terms not mine.

We also had a guest lecturer over during the course of the week in the person of Adesanmi Oguntade of
Snaptures Photography. He shared his experiences with us regarding how he ventured into photography
to escape a certain academic frustration but it turned out not bad, he shared how he had failed and
excelled thus far in his photography career. I also learnt the principle of low-end customers and how
they can proportionate to great business transactions. Often times we neglect marketing to a set of
people thinking that the other set cannot afford to hire us, of course not everyone is your client, but we
can even make transform people into marketing for us without directly rendering a substantial service
to them.

My name is Enor Izomor and I’m proud to be female photographer interning at eloPhotos Academy.

Caught In A WEB


He just stood there still as a rock. He should fight for his life, struggle his way out of that unfavorable situation; I expect that he’d at least give it a try. Still he was still; I stopped to ponder for a minute, he didn’t seem to be worried about the situation he was in.

Why wasn’t he worried? Why wasn’t he devastated? Why wasn’t he struggling his way out? Why? Why? Why?

I had been in this place called Akonko, somewhere in south-western Nigeria, since the day before and seeing the lifestyle of the people in this village I was marveled; nothing like I’d ever seen before. They were so carefree and not tensed unlike the city I live in where even the oxygen we breathe in is tensed. I’ve said it times and again that if there’s a reason to worry, then these people had more than enough reasons. Where there is no electricity, no good drinking water, no health care facility, no internet or mobile network source, school fees worth less than N1k seems unaffordable, schools are equal to a dead end and a lot more that can’t be written; I think there’s no better definition for misery than these but ironically these people didn’t see it as that but were even more carefree than people that had all that and more.

This butterfly was caught in a web and when I expected it to be worried and struggle its way out of the web, it just stood there and watched in patience. I’m guessing it had earlier been struggling and fighting to get out of the web and that didn’t seem to be working so he opted to try a calmer and stress-less method, it’s just a guess but I suppose the worry-free spirit was abundant in the village called Akonko where I captured this butterfly.

Relating this to our lives, as long as man lives there will always be reasons to worry and when you try worrying does it work? I can say 99% of the time it doesn’t work except you’re banking on the negligible 1%; so I was thinking why not emulate the Akonko approach and try the calmer method. It’ll cost you nothing to try anyway; let’s reduce the hypertension in the world and loosen the web easily, it all begins with you.

Just so you know I released the butterfly afterwards.

butterfly caught in a web in akonko

butterfly caught in a web in akonko