Beyond A Photographer’s Viewfinder


My name is ONOS and here’s my photographic view of my first few days as an intern at eloPhotos Studios.

The week started on a different note with the Monday morning devotion back in place. It was a time where we fellowshipped with one another and committed the activities of the new week into God’s hands. It started with a few worship songs by Mr. Tayo Babalola and thereafter a brief exhortation was given by Mr. Seun Akisanmi. He talked about the power of the tongue as he emphasized on the need for us to be watchful of what we say to others as it will go a long way.

At about 9am, training commenced with intensive lectures on composition in photography by Mr. Samuel and Mr. Afolabi. Both facilitators made me to understand better that beyond a photographer’s viewfinder is the art of composition which is placing or arranging visual elements or ingredients in a work of art. Mr. Afolabi talked extensively on the famous Rule of Thirds that basically has to do with the photographer placing the subject off the centre of the frame. The rule of perspective, 70-30, 80-20, and 50-50, were also discussed in detail.

Mr. Samuel went further to say that good or correct composition is impossible to define precisely and there are no hard and fast rule to follow that ensures good composition in every photograph. According to him, there are only principles and elements that provide a means of achieving pleasing composition when applied properly. Some of these principles and elements he made mention of are balance, shape and lines, pattern, texture, tone, contrast, framing, foreground, background, lighting, volume, simplicity, subject placement, center of interest and the viewpoint/camera angle.

The facilitators expantiated on the art of composition, types of photography, and the forms of photographing on Tuesday and Wednesday. According to Mr Samuel the forms of photographing has to do with portraits and landscape. Some of the types of photography he mentioned and discussed were fashion, travel, event/concept, wedding, advertising/product, food, underwater, sport, war, aerial, documentary/street, portraiture, landscape/nature, wildlife, architectural, and lifestyle photography.

On Wednesday, Mr. Afolabi of 4labi 4tos and Mr. Adebayo of Twelve 05 photography talked explicitly on documentary/street and product/food photography respectively.

Training on Thursday happened to be very insightful as the pricing and business aspect of photography were treated in-depth by the lead facilitator Mr. Samuel. He advised us as upcoming photographers to never be too quick to give a price to a client over the phone. He said we should try to calculate all the cost involved. Cost that will be involved includes transportation, printing, producing album book, framing, camera/equipment rental, accommodation, design of album, creative fee, refreshment, and cost of going with an assistant and all these should all be considered during the calculations.

He went further to say that it is fair to charge 5% of the cost of your camera/equipment as an equipment rental fee. He also said that in calculating profit you either markup which has to do with using a multiplying factor or you use a percentage on your cost as profit. A client’s bill is the addition of the cost plus the profit.

On Friday, training sessions continued with Mr. Samuel lecturing on light and the use of studio lighting gadgets. Series of practice sessions were done inside the studio and later outside the premises with the use reflectors to bring in more light to a subject. The day ended with a studio shoot session that involved two models, a makeup artist and a hair stylist where I assisted in holding the reflector and adjusting the main and fill light.

Finally during the cause of the shoot, I noticed that the models had their preferred sides which they loved to be photographed. The makeup and hair style done on the models helped to enhance their looks and make their beauty quite flattering. I also found out from my colleagues that photographing models may not be lucrative as compared to shooting weddings. However, models are certainly the most easy and beautiful clients to shoot and will most likely be repeat customers year after year when they need to build up their portfolio.

My name is Onos & I’m proud to be a PHOTOGRAPHER.

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